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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 691 (some duplicates have been removed)
nominated by president obama to be our ambassador to iraq. and i think all of us on the committee are pleased the president has nominated somebody of high caliber, great experience, who is our defense server vanessa the deputy chief of mission in baghdad for the year and previously served as ambassador to jordan and executive assistant to secretary of state, colin powell and condoleezza rice. while america's war has ended in iraq, the struggle for iraq's future obviously has not ended. the violence is down, but al qaeda and iraq remains a very deadly foe and iraq may not capture the jays today headlined. then no one should make the mistake to somehow come to a conclusion that iraq doesn't present extraordinary challenges. this administration has worked tirelessly to ensure that it doesn't become a forgotten front. we put in place a road mac on a browser to have issues. political, economic, educational, scientific and military. our bilateral partnership has potential to contribute, we believe to the stability in the middle east. but iraqi leaders have to decide for themselves what
from iraq and afghanistan and they can't find work. and and so we come out of the recession and the recovery way a higher percent of unemployment and especially veterans under age 24 have an even higher percentage of unemployed, and so what we have here is a piece of legislation to give an unemployment cushion for veterans for at least a year until they can find employment in the private sector, and this is employment to do things that we need since so many of our national resources such as parks, such as emergency responders, such as firefighters, such as police need help. look at all the unfunded things that are deteriorating in the national parks. this would be an opportunity to employ those veterans and employ them up to a year. everybody knows that this makes common sense and it's the right thing to do, and what's happening is the folks on that side of the aisle because we are in an election and because this happened to be a proposal coming out of the white house and is brought to the floor by this senator from florida, they're not going to support it and they're going
think that troops should be sent back into iraq? >> i absolutely do not think we need to send troops back to iraq. we have done our job in iraq in the military sense. i mean engagement diplomatically and engagement with the people of iraq. iraq has very troublesome neighbors. a successful iraq has the potential to change the face of the middle east. our engagement should be deep, but it should be political, diplomatic and social and economic. >> belva: how do you think the rise of china will or does have an effect on the health of california? >> the rise of china as an economic power is one of the major stories of the late 20th and 21st century. i was in china in 1988 in beijing. the streets of beijing were a competition between a few horse carts and automobiles and a lot of bicycles. that is not the china of today. it has been an economic miracle. china, it can be an economic miracle which is good for the international economy. we should be able to have the chinese have freer trade to have exports into china. we need robust chinese economic growth to fuel the international economy.
to extradite iraq that if you did to rise president after he was sentenced to death in a set -- in absentia. the turkish prime minister said hashimi can stay in turkey as long as he wants to. james reynolds has this. >> tariq al hashimi is meant to be on death row in baghdad, but instead we met him at a hotel in turkey. iraq that the vice-president dismissed the iraqi court that a verdict. >> the verdict was not -- from -- was not a surprise to me. i thought this verdict to be taken by this unreliable trial. >> this is the man he blames for the verdict, iraq that the prime minister, north al-maliki. the two men lead iraq that a rival communities of sunnis and shias. iraq's vice president said he was prepared to go back to iraq under two conditions. >> i am ready any time, provided that security is prepared for me. and fair trial. >> does it mean the trial without the government of north al-maliki? >> the problem we are facing, james -- the case of the accusation. let us talk about how to put an end or how to find a suitable exit for the current political impasse we are facing. >> the presen
revenge in the mountains and deserts of iraq and afghanistan. because a transformative moment for me, was imbedded with the first battalion of the fifth marines, in kuwait in march 2004, and we were making an overland journey of several hundred miles to fallujah, and fallujah was not yet in the news. the battle was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah, and all we did was transport one marine battalion from one place to another. no fighting in between. wasn't particularly dangerous. but the logistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water bottles. a tool kit. meals ready to eat. it was just an immense logistical exercise to get men and women and materiale from northern kuwait to fallujah without any fighting, and there you saw how distance mattered. how you just couldn't defeat distance through the latest technology. >> i think it might be interesting for the audience if you'd personalize the story of iraq a little bit, and talk about your own views. this is a place you knew, that you traveled in, in the 1980s and the time of saddam hussein. you were a s
about the future of the marine corps. >> you commanded troops in iraq and afghanistan. what are the three enduring lessons that marines will have to take with them well into the future about irregular warfare and counterinsurgency. >> i believe we learned a couple of things coming out of afghanistan and iraq. the need for the cultural awareness piece of any place we go, we have to know the battle space, know our allies, know our enemy better than we have in the past perhaps. we need to carry that forward with us. we'll remember that i think we're also going to remember the fact we need to be adaptable. you need to be flexible both in our tactics, our procedures and our act to get the -- and our ability to get the equipment our soldiers need as warfare changes and the enemy adapts to our methods and our procedures. lastly i think of course is protection against very simple weapons produced but very effective weapons produced against us at we have to adapt ourselves to very quickly. >> it's written that the marines should dedicate 30,000 of its force on regular warfare and 70,
to how we get the country back in order. plus, very first u.s. ambassador to iraq, a lot of businesses who wanted to jump right in to help rebuild iraq because it can make them a lot of money. how has that come along. ashley: we look forward to it. the cme group, the nymex. let's begin, thank you for joining us at the nyse. look, the initial economic data was pretty miserable, but the market is not really responding. >> clearly nobody's paying attention to the u.s., it is all about china, the additional stimulus and all of that. traders really have found this market to be quite oversold taking the opportunity to ride on the back of good headlines because that is all that is driving us is headlines. make some money. i think they're taking a little bit of money off the table at the end of the day. ashley: are we due for a correction anytime soon? >> you're hearing a lot for people talking about corrections for what people would normally expect after a run-up like this if you are going to have a correction. some pundits say as much as 25% would not surprise them. a lot of negative stuff.
was a striking scene in the iraq war. i had to find out more about the story and as i interviewed scores of american and iraqi colleagues they came to realize that perhaps his story is critical to understanding america's role of the world stage in the post-bin laden, post arab spring area and maybe even to discover more about what it truly means to be an american. the historical impact of what travis and patrick did as a colleague was rather -- patrick and was a key in the iraq war. infect the war began to turn around in mid-2006, once before the famous surge started happening as patriquin and his military and intelligence colleagues helped iraqis launch something called the awakening which was a sunni tribal revolt against al qaeda. al qaeda of course had never really conquered and held a large piece of territory in the world. there were some exceptions, but what happened in anbar province was al qaeda basically conquered the province and they set up a parallel government, sharia law, courts, a parallel ministry even of government and the rule of this version of radical, radical islam o
've got a commander in chief who said he would end the war in iraq in a responsible way, done that, refocus on al qui, key terrorist leaders have been taken off the battlefield, a plan to end the war in afghanistan and he's worked to restore alliances around the world and you've now seen governor romney on the world stage, he's been unsteady, alienated our closest ally, he's weighed in on sensitive international situations without a full set of facts, as they develop, and if you're looking for a strong and steady commanders in chief, i think americans will side with the president of the united states. >> i wanted to also play a little bit of what mitt romney said on taxes on fox today. >> i do believe that we should have enough jobs and enough take home pay such that people have the privilege of higher incomes that allow them to be paying taxes. i think people would like to be paying taxes. >> ben, is that an effective response on the 47% comments? >> well, governor romney certainly talked before about how the fact that he personally tries to pay the lowest rate possible. look, med
of countries including yemen, somalia, and iraq. in particular al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is the group most likely we think to attempt attacks against the united states. we saw this in may with the disruption of an plot to take down an airliner. other groups such as the al qaeda in iraq, as well as militants based in pakistan all pose threats to our citizens and interests in those regions of the formed. -- world. we are also focused on threats poses by iran and hezbollah. iran remains the foremost state sponsor of terrorism over the world. over the past year the threat from iranian sponsored terrorism has increased. inside the united states we remain vigilant to prevent violent extremists from carrying out attacks in the name of al qaeda. this past week the f.b.i. arrest add chicago man after he tried to blow up a crowded bar in the city. a federal judge sentence add virginia man to 0 years in prison for plotting to bomb the u.s. capitol. these plots highlight the danger that al qaeda-inspired extremists pose to our country. beyond these threats we face a period of unrest and a period
in building hospitals. they also pledge to work to promote export to iraq and to train personnel to operate such devices. >> e will work with the japanese government to raise iraq's medical capabilities. >> the equipment maker official added that his company hopes to provide the devices that will best suit iraq's needs. the japanese government has proposed a second site for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste from the accident at the fukushima nuclear plant. on thursday, senior environment minister visited the governor which borders foesh ukushima to south. suggested as a site, the national forest in the prefecture and explained the forest is far from residential areas, offers sufficient space and topographically and geologically stable. the governor replied he needs to consult with local residents and municipalities as the matter is very important to them. later he visited the city hall and met with the mayor to seek his cooperation. he is firmly oppose to the government's proposal. local residents also have mixed feelings. >> i understand there must be a site some where. i can't c
in geneva. in addition to the foreign ministers of the permanent five we had qatar, kuwait, turkey and iraq there, with the secretaries general of the arab league and the u.n.. and the whole idea was to review syria, not in the competitive sort of where this group supports but to come together to see how we can move forward. and we agreed on the need for political transition and political settlement. and came up with guidelines and principleses for political-- if you wish a road masically saying there has to be an interim government, an interim government that will have full executive power. we need to try and maintain the security forces so that people will be protected and particularly in a situation where they also have chemical weapons. that has to be protected. as well as insurance that governmental institutions do not collapse. nobody wants a chaotic collapse. and everybody agreed. all, and they were to come to new york and endorse that agreement. tha has n been done yet. >> why not? >> i think when they got to new york they did not focus on building on that substantive gain in again
. that serious yah is iraq. it's just the twin sister. it's a ba'athist regime ruling a multiethnic society. iraq had a sunni minority ruling a shiite majority with kurds and other minorities on the side. syria has a shiite minority ruling a sunni majority with kurds and other minorities. they are mirror images of each other. now, what happened in iraq was we pulled the pin. we remed e dictator at the top and that led to an explosion sand what american did in iraq was the geopolitical equivalent >> rose: we weren't prepared for what would happen after we removed the pin. >> but then we did the geopolitical equivalent of falling on a grenade. we absorbed the entire explosion. we iraqis most of all. i'm saying our presence there prevented it from becoming a regional conflagration. and we then presided over-- largely because of mistakes originally-- but in many cases it was probably inevitable a civil war as the parties contested the new balance of power. let them each test each other. they finally reached a point of exhaustion and balance. we then midwife add social contract between them and on the
of a sectarian war in syria that not only destabilizes syria but destabilizes lebanon, iraq, jordan and potentially turkey. the opportunity is to move with countries in the region like turkey and jordan and others in iraq who are waiting for u.s. leadership, and to bring an end to that regime sooner because we have seen the longer it goes the more people die, the more sectarian it is. the more it upsets the neighborhood. in destabilizing the neighbor the question is how to do it. we can talk about it. i think the way you do it is to empower those people who are fighting for their future and give them the weapons so that they can topple the regime themselves. but the mindsets that any president needs to have is this is not just a single crisis management situation. we handled tunisia, libya, egypt and syria. this runs the risk of a meltdown in the middle east. it is a strategic challenge but also a strategic opportunity to try to further emphasize and establish yet another example where sunni and shiite and other minorities are working together to define a common future which is what
the same logistical force, the same command and control for two land works, iraq and south korea is no longer needing a land force from you in order to protect it, we could do it with air power, what's the new strategy? that's what's missing in in debate. a strategy and force capability metric, not one based on how many ships and aircraft when each can do so much more than before. >> let's go into the military aspect of it a little more. you talk about the difference between a cold war military and a 21st century military. the tactics are different and the nature of victory is different. are we prepared as a military, are we adjusted to the modern way of fighting, or are we not there dwryet? >> no, we're not there yet. for example, china to where the president has rightly shifted the focus in the western pacific, which is the center of gravity for america not just in tec terms of security but our economic interests. it has 80 submarines today. we have 50. do we want to procure another 30 at $2 billion a pop and try to have each submarine find each other like needles in a haystack
in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the regime has the wherewithal and maybe more importantly the willingness to stay in power and do what it takes to stay in power. so i think the united states and the west and others opposed to the assad regime have backed up these predictions of imminent demise. every time there is a prominent affection, everyone says the
by kurdish militants on bases near the southeastern border with syria and iraq. >> 100 guerrillas took part in the operation, the latest in a growing number of attacks. they have also kidnapped turkish government officials in the last few weeks. >> the outlawed pkk attack under the cover of night near the iraq border. some 100 militants launched the attack, shooting at security posts with grenade launchers and machine guns. the clash went on for three hours. after daybreak, a turkish security forces cordoned off the area. seven were wounded. 10 were killed. about 10 members of the pkk killed as well. a car bomb blamed on them killed 10 people including civilians. there has been a sharp increase between fighting groups. they fear the group is gaining strength. they held a memorial for the soldiers. their bodies were flown out by helicopter. >> for the latest, let's go live to tomas in istanbul. how serious is the situation after this? the usually launched large scale offenses in the wake of the type of attacks. >> it has been the same case right now. the sophistication of the latest pkk atta
at reptilian reproduction doesn't end in tears of a different variety. >> to the wars in iraq and afghanistan have dramatically increased the number of troops or about suffering from post- traumatic stress disorder. here in the u.s., 300,000 troops are estimated to be affected. the military is planning millions to help veterans cut when they return home. we visited the u.s. military technology lab in washington state and since this report. >> the human hamster ball and aren't any big. it is virtual reality technology on trial by the u.s. military to help treat veterans for posttraumatic stress. in this case, recreating a foot patrol in iraq or sitting at the wheel of an armored car when a roadside bomb goes off. they are a frequent cause of trauma, recreating what happens in the way it happens, reliving events as realistically as possible, one way of getting over a traumatic event. >> it may be appealing to service members and give us the opportunity to treat some that otherwise would not come in. and it may result of better treatment outcome. >> more computer came than sitting on a couch, bu
influenced the regime in iraq and prepared to shed a lot of syrian blood to stay in power. they finance hezbollah and hamas in gaza strip and worse of all they continue to build a broad and nuclear weapons program. what is unmistakable despite the blurs ter that is coming from the obama administration, they are not afraid of the united states. they do not fear this president. they do not fear the united states. they do not fear consequences for their actions. as long as that belief holds true in tehran they will continue to support terrorists and build a nuclear weapons program. >> greta: a u.s. senator once said to me while i was lamenting there were so many problems across the world, he said to me we can't solve the problems, we can only manage them. that should be our goal in light of the fact so many variables. are we managing these different hot spots around the world and give him a good grade at managing them? >> no. i don't agree with the premise we can't solve problems. that is very european view of the world. i think americans are problem solving people. i think that is what we
for their role in the deaths of prisoners in iraq and afghanistan. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. mitt romney accepted the republican presidential nomination thursday night with a vow to revive the u.s. economy and a plea to voters disappointed with president obama's first term. >> how many days have you woken up thinking something special was happening in america? many of you felt that way on election day four years ago. hope and change had a powerful appeal. tonight ask a simple question. if you felt that excitement when you voted for barack obama, shouldn't you feel that way now that he is president obama? [applause] you know there's something wrong with the kind of job his son as president and the best feeling you had was the day you voted for him. >> we will have more from romney's speech after the headlines. the justice department has announced it will not prosecute anyone involved in the killing and torturing of prisoners in cia custody after a three-year investigation. the justice depar
way in terms of foreign policy? iraq, iran, afghanistan, syria, china. a long list of problems. and some say the list of solutions is very short. without american leadership, what would the world look like? we'll talk about that coming up. >>> plus, hit the democratic national convention in charlotte. president clinton talks economics. he's coming up tonight. but before that, and before the break, five big wednesday movers with a big move to the upside in office depot. better than 13% and monster worldwide is up almost 8%. more "power" coming up. >>> tonight as you know the democrats rolling out big business backers to explain that the obama administration's economic plans are working. one of those backers is austin liggen. welcome back. nice to have you here today. >> thanks very much. i'm glad to be here. >> we talked to a lot of business leaders on "power lunch" and cnbc and a lot of them feel uncertain and the jobless rate at levels no one want it is see, so why is it you think the administration's policies have worked for the economy? >> well, look. i think you need to ste
and fought alongside this country prosperous soldiers in iraq and afghanistan -- this country's bravest soldiers in iraq and afghanistan. like all veterans, i swore an oath to defend this country. our country made a promise, too. a promise to support us overseas and to fight for us when we came home. i am here tonight to say that president obama has kept that promise. >> yes, sir! >> i noticed -- i now live with my wife and son in the great state of colorado. many of the men and women with whom i served never returned home. others came home bearing visible and invisible scars of battle. when they and their families needed help, our commander in chief was there for them. from extending veterans benefits to strengthening the v.a. health system, president obama knows that the military is the standard for american values. it was wrong that men and women that i served with could be told that they were not good enough just because of their sexual orientation. [applause] soldiers that i trusted with my life and fought alongside with could be discharged simply because of who they loved. preside
for not being forthcoming. remember that there was the war in iraq. there was a strong push on the part of the europeans, especially britain, germany, and france not to go to the security council because they saw iran going the way of iraq. going to the security council would be a mandate for war. countries like france had been at odds with the united states over iraq and did not want to be at odds with the u.s. over iran, but wanted to stop the united states from doing what it did to iraq. we had a dramatic event where the foreign ministers of germany, in october, 2003, struck an agreement where iran would embark on uranium enrichment. it is the ultimate in dual use technology. it had the united states stepping back and britain, germany, and france became known as the eu3. in november of 2004, iran went along with this saying they would also be a part of uranium enrichment. but he doesn't buy, eu3 was submitting a proposal to iran promising help for its program. this is where you get another big in theme. the eu3 was unable to do anything because the and the states was not there. they
officer. host: have you traveled overseas? caller: i have done two tours in iraq and two in afghanistan. host: what about president obama leaving iraq and planning to leave afghanistan? aq, he should've gotten a status of forces agreement with the government over there and we should of maintains an air base so we would have a presence. now we have left and recently there were saying how many shipments of weapons from iran are flying over iraqi airspace into syria to support the assad regime with all the atrocities committed over there. in terms of afghanistan, joe biden was the only person in washington who got afghanistan right from the beginning. if you look at the debate with the obama surge happened, when we were going to decide between $10,000, 40,000, and 80,000 troops, it was joe biden, he was the only one who said that, let's stick to our issues and our priorities. i was wounded in afghanistan during a a non-transmission, walking down the street in a dusty village that we were being pulled out of. i was nearly killed for essentially nothing, trying to bring some kind of ideal of
iosamabin laden is gone. he also said we'd end the war in iraq responsibly. we've done that. he has protected civilians in libya, and qaddafi is gone. i serve up at the united nations, and i see every day the difference in how countries around the world view the united states. they view us as a partner. they view us as somebody they want to work with. they view president obama as somebody they trust. our standing in the world is much stronger so it charge of weakness is really quite baseless. >> schieffer: do you think mitt romney spoke inappropriately when he criticized and issued a statement so early in this turmoil? >> bob, i think you know, in my role, i'm not going to jump into politics and make those judgments. that's for the american people to decide. >> schieffer: madam ambassador thank you for being with us. >> thank you very much. >> schieffer: and joining us now for his take on all this, the ranking republican on the senate armed services committee, john mccain. senator, you've got to help me out here. the president of libya says that this was something that had been in t
of our example. where we bring our troops home from afghanistan just as we probably did from iraq. -- probably did from iraq. [applause] -- probably --proudly did from iraq. a future where we fell the only truly sacred obligation we have as a nation. the only truly sacred obligation we have is to prepare those who we send to war and care for them when they come home from war. tonight i want to acknowledge -- [applause] i want to acknowledge as we should every night to the incredible that we owed to the family of those 6473 fallen angels. those 49,746 wounded. thousands critically. thousands who will need help for the rest of their lives. folks, we must never, ever forget their sacrifice. always keep them in our care and prayers. my fellow americans, we now find ourselves at the hinge of history. the direction we turn is literally in your hands. it has been a truly great honor to serve p.o. and to serve with barack who has always stood up with you. for the past four years. i have seen him tested and i know his command and faith. i also know the incredible confidence he has in all o
. about ten years ago, perhaps, iran was under direct threat. those who have occupied iraq and afghanistan were threatening iran on a daily basis. i do not believe that we are under any special conditions now from those sources, but the fact that the world -- historic period in the worlis coming to an end, an era during which power has set the first and last word. those holding the keys to power have set the fate of many populations. that era is coming to an end. >> the big catalyst for protests at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the prophet muhammed. as a result, there was an attack as you know on the american embassy in benghazi in libya. the ambassador christopher stevens was murdered. do you condemn the attack which caused his murder? >> translator: fundamentally, first of all, any action that is provocative offends the religious thoughts and feelings of any people, we condemn. likewise, we condemn any type of extremism. of course, what took place was ugly, offending the holy prophet is quite ugly. this has very little or nothing to do with fr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 691 (some duplicates have been removed)